© Copyright The Marron Growers Association of WA 2016

Welcome

To the Marron Growers Association of WA

The association works to represent, inform, support and assist marron growers and those looking to set up commercial marron growing on whatever scale. We work closely with state and federal government departments to represent the views of our members and provide a forum for discussion that serves the best interests of the industry as a whole and the environments in which we operate. This website brings together a wealth of experience drawn from our members to provide a focal point for our educational efforts to assist new growers start up in the industry and existing growers to improve their production through research and shared experience. Please take the time to look through the information on offer on this site and do not hesitate to contact us through the site with your comments, suggestions and contributions to help us make this a resource for all marron growers. Why not join the Association today and help us shape our industry for the future

Marron Aquaculture in

Western Australia -  A

Manual for Growers

The Marron Aquaculture in Western Australia - A Growers Manual is an extensive practical guide for anyone who is starting up or investing in a marron farm in Western Australia, and for existing marron growers who wish to expand their productivity. Much of the book will also be of interest to anyone who wishes to know more about marron in general , or is passionate about marron as a gourmet food.
It provides specific, useful and practical information for successfully growing marron in WA. The book finishes with a selection of marron recipes. The authors include successful marron farmers, marron researchers and a marron wholesaler

A Wealth of Information

Written by Ravi Fotedar, Bruce Philips, Ron Robertson, Steve Vidovich and Sue Harris, this book is a must for all serious marron growers. It contains a wealth of informative articles, graphs, tables and photographs.
The book is available to order from this website by electronic funds transfer or cheque or direct from the Association. Whether you are a hobby farmer, large marron producer, government department or just have an interest in marron you’ll find this book essential reading. You can view extracts from the book including photographs and text on the growers manual page, just follow this link..
Working Hard for Western Australian Marron Growers

The Official Magazine of the Marron Growers Association of

Western Australia

Firstly, i need to start by thanking the membership for electing me as president for the coming year. Secondly i need to apologise for the delay in getting this edition of the bulletin out. it is a privilege to come into this position at a time when membership of the MGA is well supported and there is a great enthusiasm around field days and Marron farming in general.  We owe a lot to outgoing President John Guest’s foresight and drive in getting various research programs underway and hope that during my time as president, we see some of his work produce results which can be implemented on Marron farms across WA. John will continue on as a committee member with a focus on the various research projects underway as well as developments of his own research on his farm in Balingup. As you will all be aware i wear a number of hats when it comes to Marron. As a producer, i am all too familiar with the highs and frustrations associated with the hits and misses of Marron farming. i am also well aware of the need to iron out the remaining mysteries of Marron farming in order to increase profitability.  i will do my best to present an unbiased opinion of various issues which present themselves throughout my role as president.  i am all too aware of the potential  conflict of interests which might arise being a wholesaler, president of the MGA and in this case, editor of the bulletin. Rest assured i have the best interests of everyone in the industry at heart. In the last decade i have read numerous publications which forecast national Marron production to have exceeded 100t/year by now and the farm gate price should have come down to around $20/kg!! So, even though prices have risen, albeit incrementally, production has not increased significantly. i put this down to a number of farms throughout the growing region having changed hands or growers simply pursuing more lucrative options. So, while a number of new producers have successfully taken up the challenge a number have also fallen by the wayside. A lot has changed during my time in the Marron industry.  When i first entered into the wholesale side of the industry, Rock Lobsters were cheaper than Marron and every Perth Restaurant worth its salt had a “WA Crayfish” dish on the menu.  During the boom time driven by the resources sector, fine dining restaurants were opening up left, right, north and south and they all wanted a Marron dish on their menu as the price of lobster went through the roof. Without dwelling on it too much i  will touch on the lobster issue as i know it seems crazy that such a disparity has appeared in recent years.  The fact is the  price of local lobster is driven entirely by the Chinese market. if China were not consuming 95% of Australia’s production the poor old lobster fisherman would still be moaning about the beach price. China’s hunger for lobster is deeply seeded in its culture, which is not easily influenced. Economies of scale, a long  established presence at the very top end of the Chinese market and tens of millions of dollars of infrastructure (without even thinking about the boats)  also help to make it all possible.  i will stop there otherwise i will sound like i’m making excuses, but if you’re interested in the subject i suggest you read “An analysis of the demand for Western Rock Lobster” which is available on the Fisheries WA website. In more recent times the local economy has slowed dramatically, some of Perth’s fine diners have closed, those who remain have had to reinvent themselves to keep up with changing trends.  Thankfully, all the while the nations infatuation with the foodie craze has continued, with Marron generally getting at least one appearance on every season of every foodie show out there. As the WA economy has slowed, demand for Marron from the East coast has gathered pace kicked along by a healthy boost from a couple of world class “pop-up “ restaurants which have graced our shores over the last couple of years. So, where to from here? We should have some results from some of the research coming to hand in the medium term which could translate into better management and more profitable Marron farming.  We still have a long way to go in regard to feeding and nutrition and we already have some irons in the fire in this regard. if we can combine steady farmgate price rises with production gains from implementing new information as it comes to hand i would say that the future for Marron farming looks good. With a  couple of new farms set to begin or continue construction during 2017 we should see some growth in coming years, provided existing producers continue at current levels or better. In other news, some of you may have heard that “Andermel” Marron on Kangaroo island has recently sold to a Chinese government backed company which might create some interesting waves into the future. Without being an authority on what motivates Chinese businessmen i’m not sure their interest lies soley in culinary / agritourism. John Guest has recently returned from Kangaroo island as part of his study tour with the idea that producers on K.i. are up against many of the same challenges facing us going forward.  i guess we will watch this one with interest. As most of you will be aware, the outbreak of Whitespot disease on a number of southern QLD prawn farms has had and will continue to have a major impact on the seafood industry nationwide. This disease is not to be taken lightly nor is the issue of biosecurity in general. it is however something we perhaps take for granted given the disease free status of our industry.  To the best of my knowledge the situation at present is that upto six farms in the Logan River area have tested positive for the disease. At present there is a ban on importation of green prawns into Australia  and Department of Fisheries WA and Department of Food and Agriculture have increased inspections and testing of all prawns coming into WA. Here’s looking forward to a prosperous 2017.

Advertise with us & reach all our members in print & on-line!

Visit the Classified section for members sales, services & suppliers

Contact secretary@marrongrowers.org if you would like to advertise on the website or in the Bulletin.

Presidents Report

Next Marron Growers Meeting:
Field Day 28th October 2017 Pemberton Sports Club.  For more information visit the News & Events section.
© Copyright The Marron Growers Association of WA 2016

Welcome

To the Marron Growers Association of WA

The association works to represent, inform, support and assist marron growers and those looking to set up commercial marron growing on whatever scale. We work closely with state and federal government departments to represent the views of our members and provide a forum for discussion that serves the best interests of the industry as a whole and the environments in which we operate. This website brings together a wealth of experience drawn from our members to provide a focal point for our educational efforts to assist new growers start up in the industry and existing growers to improve their production through research and shared experience. Please take the time to look through the information on offer on this site and do not hesitate to contact us through the site with your comments, suggestions and contributions to help us make this a resource for all marron growers. Why not join the Association today and help us shape our industry for the future

Marron Aquaculture in Western Australia -  A

Manual for Growers

The Marron Aquaculture in Western Australia - A Growers Manual is an extensive practical guide for anyone who is starting up or investing in a marron farm in Western Australia, and for existing marron growers who wish to expand their productivity. Much of the book will also be of interest to anyone who wishes to know more about marron in general , or is passionate about marron as a gourmet food.
It provides specific, useful and practical information for successfully growing marron in WA. The book finishes with a selection of marron recipes. The authors include successful marron farmers, marron researchers and a marron wholesaler

A Wealth of Information

Written by Ravi Fotedar, Bruce Philips, Ron Robertson, Steve Vidovich and Sue Harris, this book is a must for all serious marron growers. It contains a wealth of informative articles, graphs, tables and photographs.
The book is available to order from this website by electronic funds transfer or cheque or direct from the Association. Whether you are a hobby farmer, large marron producer, government department or just have an interest in marron you’ll find this book essential reading. You can view extracts from the book including photographs and text on the growers manual page, just follow this link..
Working Hard for Western Australian Marron Growers

The Official Magazine of the Marron Growers

Association of Western Australia

Firstly, i need to start by thanking the membership for electing me as president for the coming year. Secondly i need to apologise for the delay in getting this edition of the bulletin out. it is a privilege to come into this position at a time when membership of the MGA is well supported and there is a great enthusiasm around field days and Marron farming in general.  We owe a lot to outgoing President John Guest’s foresight and drive in getting various research programs underway and hope that during my time as president, we see some of his work produce results which can be implemented on Marron farms across WA. John will continue on as a committee member with a focus on the various research projects underway as well as developments of his own research on his farm in Balingup. As you will all be aware i wear a number of hats when it comes to Marron. As a producer, i am all too familiar with the highs and frustrations associated with the hits and misses of Marron farming. i am also well aware of the need to iron out the remaining mysteries of Marron farming in order to increase profitability.  i will do my best to present an unbiased opinion of various issues which present themselves throughout my role as president.  i am all too aware of the potential  conflict of interests which might arise being a wholesaler, president of the MGA and in this case, editor of the bulletin. Rest assured i have the best interests of everyone in the industry at heart. In the last decade i have read numerous publications which forecast national Marron production to have exceeded 100t/year by now and the farm gate price should have come down to around $20/kg!! So, even though prices have risen, albeit incrementally, production has not increased significantly. i put this down to a number of farms throughout the growing region having changed hands or growers simply pursuing more lucrative options. So, while a number of new producers have successfully taken up the challenge a number have also fallen by the wayside. A lot has changed during my time in the Marron industry.  When i first entered into the wholesale side of the industry, Rock Lobsters were cheaper than Marron and every Perth Restaurant worth its salt had a “WA Crayfish” dish on the menu.  During the boom time driven by the resources sector, fine dining restaurants were opening up left, right, north and south and they all wanted a Marron dish on their menu as the price of lobster went through the roof. Without dwelling on it too much i  will touch on the lobster issue as i know it seems crazy that such a disparity has appeared in recent years.  The fact is the  price of local lobster is driven entirely by the Chinese market. if China were not consuming 95% of Australia’s production the poor old lobster fisherman would still be moaning about the beach price. China’s hunger for lobster is deeply seeded in its culture, which is not easily influenced. Economies of scale, a long  established presence at the very top end of the Chinese market and tens of millions of dollars of infrastructure (without even thinking about the boats)  also help to make it all possible.  i will stop there otherwise i will sound like i’m making excuses, but if you’re interested in the subject i suggest you read “An analysis of the demand for Western Rock Lobster” which is available on the Fisheries WA website. In more recent times the local economy has slowed dramatically, some of Perth’s fine diners have closed, those who remain have had to reinvent themselves to keep up with changing trends.  Thankfully, all the while the nations infatuation with the foodie craze has continued, with Marron generally getting at least one appearance on every season of every foodie show out there. As the WA economy has slowed, demand for Marron from the East coast has gathered pace kicked along by a healthy boost from a couple of world class “pop-up “ restaurants which have graced our shores over the last couple of years. So, where to from here? We should have some results from some of the research coming to hand in the medium term which could translate into better management and more profitable Marron farming.  We still have a long way to go in regard to feeding and nutrition and we already have some irons in the fire in this regard. if we can combine steady farmgate price rises with production gains from implementing new information as it comes to hand i would say that the future for Marron farming looks good. With a  couple of new farms set to begin or continue construction during 2017 we should see some growth in coming years, provided existing producers continue at current levels or better. In other news, some of you may have heard that “Andermel” Marron on Kangaroo island has recently sold to a Chinese government backed company which might create some interesting waves into the future. Without being an authority on what motivates Chinese businessmen i’m not sure their interest lies soley in culinary / agritourism. John Guest has recently returned from Kangaroo island as part of his study tour with the idea that producers on K.i. are up against many of the same challenges facing us going forward.  i guess we will watch this one with interest. As most of you will be aware, the outbreak of Whitespot disease on a number of southern QLD prawn farms has had and will continue to have a major impact on the seafood industry nationwide. This disease is not to be taken lightly nor is the issue of biosecurity in general. it is however something we perhaps take for granted given the disease free status of our industry.  To the best of my knowledge the situation at present is that upto six farms in the Logan River area have tested positive for the disease. At present there is a ban on importation of green prawns into Australia  and Department of Fisheries WA and Department of Food and Agriculture have increased inspections and testing of all prawns coming into WA. Here’s looking forward to a prosperous 2017.

Advertise with us & reach all our members in

print & on-line!

Visit the Classified section for members sales,

services & suppliers

Contact secretary@marrongrowers.org if you would like to advertise on the website or in the Bulletin.
Next Marron Growers Meeting:
Field Day 28th October 2017 Pemberton Sports Club.  For more information visit the News & Events  section.

Presidents Report